Books on Wars and Genocides

June 16, 2018

Remnant from Stari Most (Old Bridge) in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina destroyed on November 9, 1993.

Never again is a phrase we hear over and over and over again when we talk of war and genocides. And yet, history continues to repeat itself. In part, history repeats itself because we don’t know the past. Few want to dive into the horrors that occurred from country to country. Most find it to be “too much” and feel they cannot stomach these realities. But we must.

We must turn into suffering. We must bear witness to what has happened. We must have the courage to confront gruesome truths.

And so I offer a brief list of books (and encourage anyone to add books in the comments) on war and genocides. I have purposefully not included books on the Holocaust, not because they aren’t important but because I wanted to highlight that these atrocities have happened around the world, despite our promises of “never again.”

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“Lazy” Activism

February 24, 2018

It’s time we stopped referring to certain types of activism as “lazy.”

This morning, I saw the UN tweet out

Referring to a  document entitled “The Lazy Person’s Guide to Saving the World” and was again struck at how activism is so often ableist.  Read the rest of this entry »


Healthcare Does Not Have a Problem With Silos

August 3, 2017

Healthcare does not have a problem with silos.

In fact, there are no silos in healthcare; there are only boundaries.

If we truly want to change healthcare, we need to break boundaries.

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Housing is a Human Right

July 30, 2017

A year ago, through the kindness of a friend, I finally got a home.  I moved into a one-bedroom apartment with my cats in a quiet neighborhood after a year of homelessness.  And in this year, I have been able to heal and find myself again.

We talk about social determinants of health, but I think few people really understand how impactful they truly are, particularly housing.

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#IrishMed Chat – Patients and Caregivers Involvement in Research

July 19, 2017

The Research Loop made made its first tweetchat debut on #IrishMed last Wednesday, July 12, 2017.  Dr. Liam Farrell from Ireland founded and moderates this tweetchat every Wednesday at 10pm BST and 5pm EST, bringing together an international group of patients, caregivers, providers, researchers, and many more to discuss a range of healthcare topics.  For this tweetchat, Liam was kind enough to have me as the co-host to talk about patient and caregiver involvement in research.

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The Insulin Crisis in America

May 16, 2017

Diabetes Blog Week continues with the topic for Tuesday being The Cost of a Chronic Illness:

Insulin and other diabetes medications and supplies can be costly.  Here in the US, insurance status and age (as in Medicare eligibility) can impact both the cost and coverage.  So today, let’s discuss how cost impacts our diabetes care.  Do you have advice to share?  For those outside the US, is cost a concern?  Are there other factors such as accessibility or education that cause barriers to your diabetes care?

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Rights

January 29, 2017

This blog has never been wonderfully defined.  It is “Health as a Human Right” because I knew when I started writing that human rights, especially the right to health is a passion of mine.  I wasn’t sure exactly where I wanted it to go and started by talking about current events or issues in healthcare and policy.  It has over the years come to include more of my personal experiences fighting physical and mental health illnesses.  And now I’m expanding the scope once again, to include all rights.

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