Healthcare Does Not Have a Problem With Silos

August 3, 2017

Healthcare does not have a problem with silos.

In fact, there are no silos in healthcare; there are only boundaries.

If we truly want to change healthcare, we need to break boundaries.

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Housing is a Human Right

July 30, 2017

A year ago, through the kindness of a friend, I finally got a home.  I moved into a one-bedroom apartment with my cats in a quiet neighborhood after a year of homelessness.  And in this year, I have been able to heal and find myself again.

We talk about social determinants of health, but I think few people really understand how impactful they truly are, particularly housing.

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See, Hear, Understand

July 30, 2017

I’ve written 2 posts on communication this year.  I’ve deleted both – the only two posts I’ve ever deleted thus far after over 6 years and 182 (soon to be 183) posts published on this site.  The first I felt people weren’t ready to hear.  The second didn’t feel true to myself.  But I’m going to make a third attempt because in the past 9 months, the subject of communication persists, from politics to healthcare to social media and relationships, and weighs on me heavily.

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Why you should pause before posting your blood sugars

July 23, 2017

At least once a day a picture of someone’s blood glucose meter reading or continuous glucose meter (cgm) graph or posting of someone’s HbA1c comes across my twitter feed.  All by well-meaning diabetics who are trying to share their experiences – for support, to relay information, to pat themselves on the back for the very hard work that is the life of someone with type 1.  But I am asking them and all diabetics to please pause before posting your blood sugars.

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The Lost Years

June 7, 2017

17 years.  Nearly half my life spent in therapy.

20 years.  Because I should have been diagnosed 3 years earlier.

10 years.  Because that’s how long I went without the right diagnosis after starting therapy.

14 years.  Of the wrong medication.

Too many years lost.

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Diabetes and the Unexpected

May 16, 2017

I thought I’d take a crack at Diabetes Blog Week for the first time this year.  It’s a week where diabetics from around the world follow writing prompts (found here) to share their experiences living with diabetes.  The title for Monday was to write about Diabetes and the Unexpected, with the following prompt

Diabetes can sometimes seem to play by a rulebook that makes no sense, tossing out unexpected challenges at random.  What are your best tips for being prepared when the unexpected happens?  Or, take this topic another way and tell us about some good things diabetes has brought into your, or your loved one’s, life that you never could have expected?

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Narrative

March 19, 2017

This week, the current president released his budget plan which included deep cuts in many of the programs that make our country great and that keep people alive.  Programs from meals on wheels to the Environmental Protection Agency to the National Institutes for Health among many others are threatened under this budget proposal in a way and to an extent they haven’t been before.  In some ways this move is not surprising to me as it continues a deep narrative about a person’s value and worth, particularly when they have very little – or rather a person’s lack of worth.  A narrative that blames and shames individuals based on stigmatizing assumptions about who people are – particularly the assumption that when someone has little, when they are poor it is a character flaw, they are merely lazy or uneducated.

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